Movie Review: Moana (2016)

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Moana (2016)

I cannot help but feel like I’ve already written something about Moana, that I’ve gushed about it somewhere…

But I can’t find it, so clearly I must do it again.

Let’s start with: I was not expecting such an epic Disney princess to emerge last year, which is silly of me, because aren’t all Disney’s princesses epic? (Even the ones who aren’t considered official princesses! Moana is the chieftain’s daughter, after all.)

Moana of Motonui has been chosen by the Ocean to play a very special part in Disney’s film: the Hero. She’s not waiting for a hero to come find her and rescue her, and Moana (the movie) isn’t about that at all. Moana is about Moana rescuing herself. Well, rescuing everyone else– and rescuing herself by proxy. About growing up, and doing the right thing even though the right thing is hard. About being stubborn, and sticking to your guns, and believing in yourself.

So much of this movie is about believing in yourself.

Born the chief’s only child, Moana stands to inherit leadership of her tribe. He’s been training her for that role her whole life. There’s just one little problem: she’d really rather… not stay on land for it. She doesn’t want to. She tries really hard not to not want to, but she doesn’t want to. It works about as well as expected. Which goes over about as well as anybody could have thought it would. Because nobody goes beyond the cove, and nobody truly leaves the island.

The whole thing is set in Ancient Polynesia, and I’m no expert in the culture, the location, the mythology– but I understand the people who crafted the movie and plot went out of their way to learn those things from the people immersed in them. I know that they also collected local talent for the voice acting, which boosts it to an A+ for me.

One of the interesting things was the music. There’s at least one entire song that never got translated to English, which gives the whole thing very much a more realistic feel to it, and I was very proud of that fact. All too often I feel that I’m not invested enough in things, but that one song being beyond me– I don’t know the words, but the words didn’t matter. I didn’t have to know the lyrics to get drawn up in it.

Also “You’re Welcome” is going to haunt me for years.

–Natasha

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Movie Review: The Last Starfighter (1984)

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The Last Starfighter (1984)

Sometimes you have to shake the dust off the good ol’ times. You  have to look at your childhood and say, yes, this one.

The Last Starfighter is one of those. I don’t remember the first time I saw this; I was young, impressionable, and enthralled with space movies. It was probably around the first time I saw the Star Wars films, come to think of it, which, uh, wow, that was a time ago. Star Wars is a different post, eventually, when I get around to it.

In the meantime, this film is over thirty years old, and managed to age pretty remarkably well. Okay, sure, the digital graphics are pretty outdated, but it was made thirty years ago, you have to give it a pass. The storyline, though, the character design, the plot? None of it comes off as cheesy, none of it is badly written. The costumes are solid, props are well made, and, well, I just love it, okay? There’s not a lot of I can tell you without absolutely gushing about this movie.

It doesn’t matter that it’s old. It was well done. And if you can get over the fact that some computer-generated graphics are a little jarring after we’ve been spoiled by new-age things so long, I heartily recommend it to you.

It’s not Star Wars. But then, nothing can be Star Wars. The Last Starfighter is just what it says on the tin, and nothing else.

–Natasha

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NaNoWriMo: Fri 10th, 2017

NaNoWriMo

About this time last year, I had some truly awful breakups. And at least one of them was caused by speaking different languages.

I don’t mean English versus French or anything like that. I mean, the words we use don’t quite mean the same thing to the pair of us. I’ve talked about the phenomenon before, but never for NaNo, I think.

Last year was hectic for everybody. It was a difficult time, especially for hermits who don’t get out much, and I won’t rehash what went on in the world at the time. There was distance between my friend and I– and maybe it was on me, maybe it was on them, it doesn’t matter. But when everything came to a head, the distance had cost us our understanding of one another’s nuances. Or perhaps we had never truly known them. But I said what I meant, and they said what they meant, and both of us heard what those words meant to us, which wasn’t either of us had quite meant, I think.

That’s going to happen to characters, too. Especially those who don’t know each other well, or come from different walks of life. Of course, on the other hand, there’s always going to be those characters who just know one another. They know every little twitch and nuance of their partner, they can practically read one another’s thoughts. They don’t have to have words, anymore, to know what would have been said and follow through with the words that weren’t.

Drift compatible, anybody? You’d be surprised how often that happens in real life.

Maybe you have characters like the first set, or maybe you have characters like the second. Both are super fun to write and even more fun to read. But everybody isn’t going to go without having errors all of the time, and those errors might help boost your word count and enhance your story rather magnificently. Can’t hurt to try it, right?

–Natasha

Wordcount: 11,246/50,000

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Movie Review: The Great Wall (2016)

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The Great Wall (2016)

So even adhering to my no-spoilers rule, there is so much I could talk about in this movie that I could vomit words at you for days and still, somehow, find more. I’ll try not to do that. But where to start?

Let’s try with what it says on the tin.

“The Great Wall tells the story of an elite force making a valiant stand for humanity on the world’s most iconic structure.”

The opening covers, also, how long the wall took to build and asks the question: what were they trying to keep out?

I’m sure there are a lot of mythos about why the Wall was built, and some were true and some possibly weren’t. No one currently alive lived in that time period, so no one can say accurately that any myth or legend is wrong, only improbable.

We do know a lot of people were hunting for black powder at the time the movie is set, and anyone who brought it home would have been set up for life, which is what starts are opening scene: possibly the only white guy in the movie and his cohort are heading for China and dealing with bandits along the way.

And that’s one of the things I love about this movie. Not because it’s got diversity– and let’s be realistic here, a movie set in China about Chinese legends is about Chinese people, so the Chinese people don’t count as part of the diversity for the movie, the non-Chinese people do– no, that’s not it. But the movie deals with very serious, realistic hazards of the time period: bandits, long stretches of limited supplies, and how very dead you can be if you lose your food. Also the hazards of native fauna.

Although native is somewhat subjective, given the movie…

The ‘elite force’ in the movie is a massive army based entirely on the Wall, which I can gleefully tell you without spoiling makes an amazing fortification. That’s part of the reason the wall exists, right? Fortifications. The army is carefully designed and fully functional, and if they existed in that context today, nobody would dare dream of invading China. Or, you know, anywhere else with similar fortifications.

I kind of want to build those fortifications. Between those and the army, they’ll make a mean reference for tabletop campaign.

I think everything the people in this show pull off is within the human limits, given proper training and equipment. And I mean a lot of proper training. Please do not watch this movie and then try it at home. I’m serious. If you want to try some of this, go find proper methods of doing it. Bungee jumping, wall climbing, learn you some martial prowess. And then remember that even this army doesn’t do it without safeguards unless they have no choice.

The graphics for this movie were superb. I know a lot of it was computer generated and much of this likely took place in front of a green screen, but unless you know for sure which is generated and which is animatronics, it’s unlikely you’re going to guess it. I can’t say for sure animatronics are in this movie, but considering the huge comeback they’re making, I also can’t say they aren’t. Terrifyingly everything in this movie looks real enough, and plausible enough, that I should be very suspicious of alternate realities where they went over and filmed this nonsense occurring.

The plot of the movie is good too. It’s not a “hero from another land” — or at least, not in the traditional sense. Sure, he’s great at warfare. Sure, the movie focuses on him. But all movies have to have a lead point of view somehow, even if that’s just you. And it’s unlikely actual traders would have gotten very far, why not send a mercenary who knows how to fight and keep himself alive?

The characters are real, intrinsically human instead of two-dimensional cookie cut-outs. And for William, the POV character? His redemption arc is pretty solid.

Bonus for those of you who get twitchy? No romantic subplot!

–Natasha
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Guest Post: Anime taught me how to live.

Guest poster Vinayak writes a post that I can fully agree with. Read on! -Natasha

Vinayak writes:

When I was a little kid, I was very shy. Easily intimidated. Afraid of my surroundings. I never liked talking to people all that much, and as a result of that, I had little to no close friends. I was even bullied, for a little while back in fifth grade. Not because of me watching anime, but because I seemed to be easy prey. I didn’t let it last long, but it did happen. But I was okay with that. I had something which I, to this day consider to be better than any friends I could have had.

No, I didn’t play sports to let out any frustrations or energy. No, I didn’t passionately play an instrument that allowed me to express my emotions through sounds. I watched anime.

I was first exposed to anime when I was about five years old and Naruto aired on cable television for the first time in my country. I absolutely loved it. From there on, I went on to watch more and more anime. I watched Capeta. I watched Bleach. I watched Death Note. And before I knew it, I had fallen in love with a medium, which in my humble opinion is the greatest medium of all time.

I didn’t need friends, rather I didn’t want them, by that point in time. I had anime. All of the shows that I watched, all of the characters that I got the opportunity to meet… they mattered more to me than anything else in the world. And they weren’t just characters to me. They were my friends. I had friends who I cared a lot about.

I remember having cheered on ‘Capeta’ during his races harder than the animated crowds ever could. I remember having spent hours memorising the words to the ‘Naruto’ opening theme just so I could sing it each time it was played. I remember having jumped with excitement when I saw Ichigo turn into a shinigami for the first time. ‘Death Note’ successfully turned apples into my favourite fruits. During classes, instead of focusing on a word my teachers were saying, I remember spacing out while thinking about the Elric brothers and where their fate would take them next. I remember that I was on the verge of tears during and after the last couple of episodes of ‘Angel Beats!’.

To be very honest, I owe a lot to anime. If it weren’t for those fictional characters who I considered, and still consider my best friends, I honestly don’t think I would be half the person that I am today. Anime taught me to be empathetic, to listen to people. I surely will not be  the nicest person if you were to ever talk to me, but I will listen to you, and I will be your friend if you need me. Anime was there for me, for a lonely little kid who was so very much intimidated by the world, and it taught me to be there for other people, and I want to be.

I want to be there for people, like the anime characters were there for me. I want to help people, like the main character from ‘Yahari Oregairu’. I want to encourage people like the characters from ‘Naruto’ encouraged me. I want to cry for real people, like I cried for the characters during and after the end of ‘AnoHana’. And someday, eventually, I want to watch my own love story unfold, just like I have countless romantic sub plots.

You know what the best part is? It’s not just me. There’s the possibility that somebody reading this may be nodding their head in agreement and understanding. Anime is a medium which has brought together people from all over the world into a singular community. And in that community, I am not the only one who has been so greatly influenced by anime. There are literally thousands of people who would stand behind me when I say that, ‘Anime has made me the person that I am.’ And you know what? They would be right. Because all of us, in this little niche of ours, are what we are… because of us the single happy accident in our lives: stumbling across anime.

-Vinayak
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NaNo Camp July, Friday 21st (2017)

NaNoWriMo

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: be kind to yourself, especially during something like NaNoWriMo. Did you remember to drink water? No? Take a few swallows. I need to do that right now myself. Did you rest well? If you’re caught up on your words, take a breather– you don’t have to sleep, but taking five or ten minutes away from the computer or journal you’re working with can do loads of wonders.

Not completing NaNo isn’t the end of the world. And NaNo isn’t over yet, anyway. Pace yourself, but don’t burn yourself out. Procrastinate when you have to. Take breathers. Remember to give your eyes a rest– reading, and by proxy writing, stresses the eyes.

And don’t forget: Every word you have written is a victory on its own, one word you didn’t have before.

–Natasha

NaNoGoal: 17,753/20,000

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NaNo Camp July, Friday 14th (2017)

NaNoWriMo

I went to a private school as a girl. It wasn’t a large school, only a couple of students, but it was legalized and I have a copy of the Board of Education’s recognition of it as such.

But despite not being a large school, it had all the trimmings. We had a School Mascot (the Mustang), we had school colors (black, maroon, navy), a school flower (the magnolia). We had regular classes, or what I assume is regular because it was normal for us. We had our subjects and the tests for those, book reports and writing classes, schedules for tutoring, though we didn’t call it tutoring, of course..

We had very few sick days because there were so few of us, so it wasn’t like the flu came in waves or anything. We never had to deal with a lice scare, and we had both inside lessons and outdoor lessons. I learned how to balance a checkbook, how to build an animal pen, how to make a quilt; complex mathematics, base sciences, human history. When we were done with class for the day, we were cut loose and left to our own devices. We had our field trips– one time, we went to an auction in another state. I saw a zebra in real life.

During the summer, the local public school had a type of summer schooling, which any child that lived in the area could attend. I only went one year due to the difficulties caused by it, but it provided me with more than enough social interaction for several lifetimes. Those of my school were outliers  to those of public school; they did not take kindly of us, and we fit in none of their pre-established dynamics.

Our school didn’t have dances. I went to one at the public school, invited by a young ma’am who attended, and I had one dance with a young man who also had no date. I bristled at a lot of people. It was strange. Not really a dance, not really a party, just… a bunch of awkward not-yet-teenagers. Three teachers tried to get me to change schools, further making it more awkward.

When I graduated, I spent the next year or so trying to figure out how to test for the GED. Some businesses counted my diploma as sufficient schooling, but a lot of them called private schools as fake, accepting only diplomas from the local public schools. No college in the area would accept it at all, since my school hadn’t been required to do standardized testing and we didn’t have GPAs. The Adult Education Center gave me the run-around on GED testing, asking “why was my primary schooling not sufficient?”

We never got Letterman jackets (a fact which I hope to rectify, eventually) and we never got high-school rings.

I remember all of these things when I write a character. The character’s history matters. From where they were born to where they went to school to the school colors and school pride they carry. Sometimes it’s just a token, a throw-back to way back when, but the little details are important too. Even if we never use them in story, it’s nice to know a little extra color about your cast.

–Natasha

NaNoGoal: 13,706/30,000

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